Ideas, Information, and Inquiry courses (“Triple I” for short) are a brand-new kind of course at Carolina. Each course brings together three outstanding professors from different departments in the College so that you can study a common theme from several perspectives. The course offers a unique chance for you to explore the different ways our university’s top scholars and teachers investigate big questions, while also building key skills you’ll use over the rest of your time at Carolina and beyond.

Click on classes below to see details, including General Education Requirements each class fulfills, a course description, the meeting pattern, and information about the instructors. For more information on the student and faculty experience in the spring 2019 Triple-I classes, see this College of Arts and Sciences feature.

Schedule: TR, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM
General Education Requirements: SS, GL

Long Course Description

This course, taught by a biologist, a linguist, and an ethnomusicologist, focuses on the idea of “race.” Historically, the idea that humans can be divided into distinct races has been a singularly pernicious one, having been used to justify the persecution, enslavement, and extermination of groups based on their presumed biological inferiority. Today, scientists agree that race is a false and distorting concept for understanding biological diversity among humans: what we describe as races are in fact social constructs, not genetic realities. Nonetheless, the idea of biological race persists in the popular imagination. In this course, students learn why race is not a viable human biological concept, how the idea of race arose historically (and continues to be maintained), and what alternative concepts exist for understanding human diversity and change over time.

Faculty Bios

Dave Pier is an ethnomusicologist who studies music and culture in Africa and the U.S. He is Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies. His book, Ugandan Music in the Marketing Era, explores the commercialization of traditional music and rural culture in contemporary Africa.

J. Michael Terry is an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics. His work focuses on the semantics of tense and aspect in dialects of American English, with a particular emphasis on African American English. Though difficult to define tense and aspect are, roughly speaking, natural language’s primary mechanisms for expressing temporal relations – i.e. notions such as past and present, progressive and completed. Among his current research projects is a study of the effects of dialectal differences on the results of tests of mathematical reasoning in early education

Daniel Matute is Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology. His research focuses on the genetic and ecological basis of reproductive isolation.

Schedule: MWF, 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Approved Gen Eds: SS

Long Course Description

This course will expose students to diverse approaches to studying topics related to happiness and subjective and physical well-being. The three professors will approach this topic from three disciplines: physiology; positive psychology; and sociology. An important aspect of the course is teaching students a variety of life skills, such as teamwork, developing social connections including “belongingness” at UNC, being physically active, and becoming confident that they can obtain the skills to increase their happiness and health.

Faculty Bios

Arne Kalleberg (Sociology) has studied how happiness differs among social categories of people and national differences in institutions and cultures

Barbara Fredrickson (Psychology and Neuroscience) has made important contributions to advancing positive psychology.

Professor Claudio Battaglini (EXSS) is an expert in exercise physiology and can provide insight on how physical activity can improve health and its potential relationships to happiness and well-being.

Schedule: MWF, 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
General Education Requirements: SS, GL
Major/Minor credit: May be used to fulfill a requirement in the Medical Anthropology minor
Syllabus

Long Course Description

Death and dying are universal human experiences. Yet there is immense cultural variation and historical fluidity to the ways we define, understand and treat death, dying and relations between the living and the dead. This course explores concepts, experiences and practices of death and dying, drawing from methodologies and approaches from Anthropology, American Studies and Psychology & Neuroscience. This course will not only consider the similarities and differences between the three discipline methodologies but will also introduce students to data literacy and principles of evidence.

Faculty Bios

Jeannie Loeb received her PhD from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, specializing in Behavioral and Integrative Neuroscience. Currently, she is a Teaching Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. She teaches a variety of courses, particularly General Psychology, Biological Psychology and the Science of Learning. She has won several teaching awards and has been an invited presenter at teaching conferences and university teaching workshops. Dr. Loeb thoroughly enjoys working with UNC students and continues to be passionate about the study of the most effective teaching and learning practices.

Jocelyn Chua is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology. As a medical anthropologist, Dr. Chua is broadly interested in people’s lived experiences of suicide, death, and violence in the contemporary world, and particularly how mental health professionals and therapies intervene to reshape how people respond to these experiences. She has conducted research in India on suicide, and is currently working on a new project examining the use of psychiatric medications in war by the United States military.

Jennifer Larson earned her PhD in English from the UNC-Chapel Hill and is a Teaching Associate Professor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. Her research interests include African-American literature (especially African American drama), Film Studies (especially race in contemporary cinema), American literature, and Composition (especially writing in/about law). She teaches courses such as Film & Culture, Literature & Law, and ENGL 105.

Schedule: MW, 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM with a recitation on Thursdays or Fridays
General Education Requirements: SS, US

Long Course Description:

What is gender and where does it come from? Is gender something that people are born with? Or are they socialized into gender roles? Is gender in the eye of the beholder? To what extent do artists represent gender issues differently? How might one best critique or challenge gender norms? Are gender differences legal ground for treating men and women differently? Or should the law prohibit treating people differently based on gender? This course will consider these questions and more through the lenses of psychology, art, history, and law. The class will explore gender-related experiences across the lifespan, consider how gender has been represented and challenged in art throughout history, and discuss the differing ways that courts and lawyers have approached cases involving gender. This course will establish a foundation from which students can think critically about gender from multiple perspectives—personal, social, cultural, political, and juridical.

Faculty Bios

Anna Bardone-Cone, PhD is the Principal Investigator of the studies conducted within the Bardone-Cone Lab. Dr. Bardone-Cone graduated from Williams College with a BA in Mathematics and French in 1991. She went on to receive her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2001, and completed her predoctoral clinical psychology internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She joined the faculty at the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2001 as an Assistant Professor of Psychology and in 2009 joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she is currently a Professor. Her primary research interests lie in the sphere of eating disorders, disordered eating, and body image. She and her lab have several lines of research including: 1) defining eating disorder recovery and remission; 2) identifying and testing pathways to bulimic symptoms with particular interest in the role played by psychosocial variables (e.g., perfectionism, self-efficacy, social comparison, stress) and how these variables interact; and 3) examining cultural, familial, and media factors related to disordered eating and body image. Dr. Bardone-Cone is a member of the Eating Disorders Research Society and a Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders, and has led an active program of eating disorder research since 1999. With her past and ongoing research studies, Dr. Bardone-Cone has sought to identify contributing factors to disordered eating and body image in order to better understand pathways to eating patterns and body image, including risk and resilience factors, and pathways to recovery. She was recently selected as a Working on Women in Science (WOWS) Scholar in the UNC College of Arts and Sciences for a two-year term, effective July 2017.

Cary Levine is Associate Professor of Contemporary Art History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His recent book, Pay for Your Pleasures: Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, Raymond Pettibon (University of Chicago Press, 2013), examines the work of three important Southern California artists. He has also written criticism for several magazines and has published numerous essays for exhibition catalogues. His current scholarship focuses on the intersections of art, politics and digital technologies.

Maxine Eichner, the Graham Kenan Distinguished Professor of Law, writes on issues at the intersection of law and political theory, focusing particularly on family relationships, social welfare law and policy; feminist theory; sexuality; and the relationship of the family, the workplace, and market forces. Professor Eichner is the author of The Supportive State: Families, Government, and America’s Political Ideals (Oxford University Press, 2010).  She is now finishing a second book, The Free-Market Family: How the Market Crushed the American Dream (and How It Can Be Restored), which considers the harsh effects that market forces are having on American families today, and which argues that the government’s role is to shield families from these forces.  She is also an editor of Family Law: Cases, Text, Problems (eds., Ellman, Kurtz, Weithorn, Bix, Czapanskiy, and Eichner, 2014). In addition, she has written numerous articles and chapters for law reviews, peer-reviewed journals, and edited volumes on law and political theory.

Schedule: TTh, 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
General Education Requirements: VP, BN
Major/Minor credit: May be used to fulfill an elective requirement in both the geography minor and major (below the 400-level).

Long Course Description

This IDEAS, INFORMATION, AND INQUIRY (Triple-I) course is taught by a visual artist, a Spanish teacher, and a geographer. It examines linguistic, geopolitical, and socio-environmental boundaries to foster an intersectional understanding of identity and belonging in the Americas. Course topics (e.g., migration, justice, and environmental wellbeing) are examined through Spanish language-based films and artwork. Critically engaging with a variety of films, students will expand their speaking, writing, vocabulary and grammar in Spanish language and study in context art and have an opportunity to discuss and learn about global issues, indigenous populations, transnational connections between different countries (immigration, cultural adaptations, labor and exploitation, ethnicity and religion) and diversity (gender issues, class, regional and religious differences). Students are asked to respond to films and art with individual and collaborative assignments that involve performance, creative design, and fabrication. The assignments seek to forge connections between the arts, humanities, and sciences. Students will create e-portfolios to feature their creations and the skills gained to a broader audience.

Faculty Bios

Gabriela Valdivia is political ecologist in the Geography Department at UNC-CH. Her research examines the political dimensions of natural resource governance. Her research spans environmental justice, resource governance, and the ethics of modern lifestyles related to oil consumption. Her latest research project focuses on the impact of oil extraction, regulatory policy and environmental practices on Native Amazon and Afro-Ecuadorian communities. She grew up in Peru and conducted ethnographic research in Ecuador and Bolivia, and brings these experiences into her courses on Latin America and courses on political ecology and nature-society relations.

Gosia Lee was born in Poland where she studied Italian Philology at the Jagiellonian University 1987-1990 in Cracow. After moving to the United States, she shifted career paths and began studying Travel and Tourism at the Central Piedmont Community College.  She soon decided to learn Spanish and complete her Italian studies at the University of NC at Chapel Hill in the Romance Languages Department.

Her interests include Italian Travel Literature, indigenous cultures and customs; teaching language, culture, film, and grammar courses; advising undergraduate students, innovative use of computer technology, digital video, photography and travel. She has been to 85 countries around the world (including 18 of 21 Spanish speaking-ones). In addition to being fluent in Italian, Spanish, Polish and English, she also has a working knowledge of Russian and French.

Susan Harbage Page is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Harbage Page is a visual artist with a background in photography and lens-based work that explores immigration, race, and gender. Her most recent work is an archeological look at the U.S. – Mexico Border through photography and site-specific art interventions.

On 11/26/2018, the Spring 2019 Triple-I courses were opened to all undergraduate students.

Schedule: MW, 9:05-9:55a with a recitation on Fridays
General Education Requirements: SS
Major/Minor credit: May be used to fulfill the gateway requirement in the PPE minor (PHIL/POLI/ECON 384)
Restriction: The course’s economics content is targeted to students who have not yet taken ECON 101, PLCY 310, or PLCY 340.

Long Course Description

This interdisciplinary course provides an overview of some core conceptual tools used to analyze issues at the intersection of philosophy, politics, and economics (PPE). It introduces students to the tools of economic analysis, including markets, prices, economic efficiency, welfare measures, and market failures. It discusses the philosophical dimensions of economics and public policy, including discussion of the nature of utility or well-being, the ethics of the price system, the value of individual liberty, and the nature of socio-economic justice. It also introduces students to the tools of political or institutional analysis, including game theory and public choice. This collection of tools, which are often employed in isolation, gain considerable power when they are brought together. Students will read widely on PPE tools, and they will explore applications to contemporary social problems. Lectures and recitations will feature a mix of traditional lectures, group work and discussions, simulations, and strategy games.

Faculty Bios

Luc Bovens is a Professor in the Department of Philosophy in UNC at Chapel Hill. He is a core faculty member in the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program. His research is in Philosophy and Public Policy, Philosophy of Economics, Rationality, and Moral Psychology.

Douglas MacKay is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Policy, a Core Faculty Member of the Center for Bioethics, and a Core Faculty Member of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program. Professor MacKay’s research interests concern questions at the intersection of justice and public policy. He is currently working on projects concerning the justice of economic inequality – both domestic and global; the ethics of immigration policy; the ethics of biomedical and policy research; and the ethics of health and welfare policy. He regularly teaches Public Policy 340 Justice in Public Policy.

Brian McManus is a Professor in UNC’s Department of Economics. His main research and teaching interests are in Industrial Organization (IO), which studies the choices of firms with market power, and in health economics. He regularly teaches an undergraduate IO course on theories of firm behavior and the impact of US antitrust laws; he also teaches a PhD course on empirical methods for IO. His recent research includes projects on asymmetric information in online markets, firms’ choices to engage in charitable behavior, pricing strategies of internet service providers, and decision-making over time in health care markets.

Schedule: TR 9:30-10:45a
General Education Requirements: SS, GL
Major/Minor credit: May be used to fulfill a requirement in the Medical Anthropology minor

Long Course Description

Death and dying are universal human experiences. Yet there is immense cultural variation and historical fluidity to the ways we define, understand and treat death, dying and relations between the living and the dead. This course explores concepts, experiences and practices of death and dying, drawing from methodologies and approaches from Anthropology, American Studies and Psychology & Neuroscience. This course will not only consider the similarities and differences between the three discipline methodologies but will also introduce students to data literacy and principles of evidence.

Faculty Bios

Jeannie Loeb received her PhD from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, specializing in Behavioral and Integrative Neuroscience. Currently, she is a Teaching Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. She teaches a variety of courses, particularly General Psychology, Biological Psychology and the Science of Learning. She has won several teaching awards and has been an invited presenter at teaching conferences and university teaching workshops. Dr. Loeb thoroughly enjoys working with UNC students and continues to be passionate about the study of the most effective teaching and learning practices.

Jocelyn Chua is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology. As a medical anthropologist, Dr. Chua is broadly interested in people’s lived experiences of suicide, death, and violence in the contemporary world, and particularly how mental health professionals and therapies intervene to reshape how people respond to these experiences. She has conducted research in India on suicide, and is currently working on a new project examining the use of psychiatric medications in war by the United States military.

Tim Marr has taught American Studies in Chapel Hill since 2000. His major research interests are American engagements with Islam/Muslims and the life and works of Herman Melville. At UNC he offers interdisciplinary courses on Birth and Death, Mating and Marriage, Captivity, Tobacco, and Myth and History in American Memory. He is presently serving as Associate Chair of American Studies and as the Director of the Faculty Fellows Program at UNC’s Institute for the Arts and Humanities. Last summer he directed an NEH Institute on Moby-Dick and the World of Whaling in the Digital Age in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Schedule: TR 9:30-10:45a
General Education Requirements: SS, GL

Long Course Description

This course, taught by a biologist, a linguist, and an ethnomusicologist, focuses on the idea of “race.” Historically, the idea that humans can be divided into distinct races has been a singularly pernicious one, having been used to justify the persecution, enslavement, and extermination of groups based on their presumed biological inferiority. Today, scientists agree that race is a false and distorting concept for understanding biological diversity among humans: what we describe as races are in fact social constructs, not genetic realities. Nonetheless, the idea of biological race persists in the popular imagination. In this course, students learn why race is not a viable human biological concept, how the idea of race arose historically (and continues to be maintained), and what alternative concepts exist for understanding human diversity and change over time.

Faculty Bios

Dave Pier is an ethnomusicologist who studies music and culture in Africa and the U.S. He is Associate Professor in the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies. His book, Ugandan Music in the Marketing Era, explores the commercialization of traditional music and rural culture in contemporary Africa.

J. Michael Terry is an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics. His work focuses on the semantics of tense and aspect in dialects of American English, with a particular emphasis on African American English. Though difficult to define tense and aspect are, roughly speaking, natural language’s primary mechanisms for expressing temporal relations – i.e. notions such as past and present, progressive and completed. Among his current research projects is a study of the effects of dialectal differences on the results of tests of mathematical reasoning in early education

Daniel Matute is Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology. His research focuses on the genetic and ecological basis of reproductive isolation.

Schedule: MW 10:10-11a with a recitation on Fridays
General Education Requirements: SS, GL

Long Course Description

This course focuses on the question of how the genre of science fiction (film and literature) has been used to address the world’s environmental concerns and how these concerns affect characters differently depending on their gender, race, and class. Using this lens, the course investigates longstanding global environmental challenges including water resources, overpopulation, consumption, climate change, etc. This course provides students with a complex toolkit to understand environmental issues. We pay special attention to texts with characters or created by artists who are women and/or ethnic minorities. Our focus throughout the course is support comparative, global, intersectional and interdisciplinary thinking.

Faculty Bios

Originally from Chicago, Priscilla Layne is Associate Professor of German and Adjunct Associate Professor of African, African American and Diaspora Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her PhD from the University of California at Berkeley. Her research and teaching draws on postcolonial studies, gender studies and critical race theory to address topics like representations of blackness in literature and film, rebellion, and the concept of the Other in science fiction/fantasy. She is author of White Rebels in Black: German Appropriation of African American Culture and her current book project is on Afro-German Afrofuturism.

Courtney Woods is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Trained in chemical engineering and toxicology, Courtney’s research interests center on the environmental and human health impacts of large-scale industrial activities near rural and traditional communities. She is currently collaborating on several projects in Brazil and eastern NC related to these topics. Courtney also teaches core public health courses in the Gillings School of Global Public Health, along with courses on community-engaged research, environmental justice and global environmental health inequalities.

Michele Tracy Berger is Associate Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Her research, teaching, and practice all focus on intersectional approaches to studying areas of inequality, especially racial and gender health disparities. This work spans the fields of public health, sociology and women’s and gender studies. Her forthcoming book is Thriving vs. Surviving: African-American Mothers and Adolescent Daughters on Health, Sexuality, and HIV (New York University Press). She is also a creative writer and her sci-fi novella, Reenu was recently published by Book Smugglers Press.

Schedule: TR 3:30-4:45p
Approved Gen Eds: SS

Long Course Description

This course will expose students to diverse approaches to studying topics related to happiness and subjective and physical well-being. The three professors will approach this topic from three disciplines: physiology; positive psychology; and sociology. An important aspect of the course is teaching students a variety of life skills, such as teamwork, developing social connections including “belongingness” at UNC, being physically active, and becoming confident that they can obtain the skills to increase their happiness and health.

Faculty Bios

Arne Kalleberg (Sociology) has studied how happiness differs among social categories of people and national differences in institutions and cultures

Barbara Fredrickson (Psychology and Neuroscience) has made important contributions to advancing positive psychology.

Professor Claudio Battaglini (EXSS) is an expert in exercise physiology and can provide insight on how physical activity can improve health and its potential relationships to happiness and well-being.

Frequently Asked Registration Questions

Yes! You may swap your Triple-I course from the time your registration appointment comes about through the fifth day of class in fall and spring terms. All seats in Triple-I courses are exclusively reserved for first-year students (including first-year transfer students!)
Yes! Any interested first-year (including first-year transfer) students may enroll in any open Triple-I course from the time their registration appointment comes about through the fifth day of class.
Detailed course descriptions and faculty bios may be found above (click on the class title for this information). You may also find descriptions and faculty bios in the course’s “Notes” section in ConnectCarolina. Here’s how:
1.) Click on the Section Link when searching for the class, or once the class is in your shopping cart.

2.) Locate the “Notes” section on the Class Details screen to read the description and faculty bios.


Gen Ed information may be found above (click on the class title for these details). You can also find this information in the course’s “Enrollment Information” section in ConnectCarolina. Here’s how:

1.) Click on the Section Link when searching for the class, or once the class is in your shopping cart.

2.) Locate the “Enrollment Information” section on the Class Details screen to see which Gen Eds the course satisfies.

Only certain Triple-I sections require a recitation. This is the way the faculty members have designed their course, and the recitations will serve as a required small group discussion section. A recitation is not “extra” work, but an integral part of a course! Please note that recitations give no hours of academic credit, and each Triple-I course (whether or not it includes a recitation section) bears 3 credit hours.
To change a recitation, you may use the Enroll > Edit function in your Student Center in ConnectCarolina. See the “Edit Feature” section here for step-by-step instructions and screen shots.
Not all Triple-I courses offer waitlists, but most Triple-I courses without recitations have waitlists. Please note that you may only waitlist for 4 total credit hours. The credit limit for undergraduate students is 17 until the open enrollment period opens (see Registrar’s Academic Calendar for important enrollment dates by semester), at which time, the maximum course load is increased to 18 credits. Waitlists auto-update in ConnectCarolina throughout the day and roll students one-by-one into open seats as they become available. Waitlists continue to update until they are purged (see Registrar’s Academic Calendar for important waitlist dates by semester)

Additional Resources

Have more questions?

Please email Nick Siedentop (nick_siedentop@unc.edu) for all questions regarding Triple-I registration!

For additional helpful registration FAQs, please reference the Registrar’s website here.