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First Year Foundations

Learning Outcomes

  1. Connect with a faculty member early in the educational process.
  2. Learn intensively among a small cohort of students.
  3. Analyze and communicate issues associated with a specific, advanced topic, covering a wide range of knowledge.
  4. Produce knowledge through self-directed inquiry and active learning.

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Learning Outcomes

  1. Connect with a faculty member early in the educational process.
  2. Learn intensively among a small cohort of students.
  3. Apply methods for how scholars pose problems, discover solutions, resolve controversies, and evaluate knowledge.
  4. Analyze and communicate issues associated with a broad, introductory topic, covering a wide range of knowledge.

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Learning Outcomes

  1. Employ conventions, genres, and rhetoric practiced in the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
  2. Conduct research using a variety of methods, databases, and sources.
  3. Discuss and present research-based arguments and information.
  4. Identify how best to use research and evidence in discipline-specific compositions.
  5. Compose using written, oral, and multimedia modes.
  6. Review and revise one’s own work and assist others in revising their work.

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Learning Outcomes

  1. Compare and contrast three distinct ways of addressing a question.
  2. Use data and evidence to apply key methods of and concerns associated with data literacy.
  3. Situate ideas and experiences in global contexts.
  4. Collaborate with others for mutual benefit.

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Learning Outcomes

  1. Increase and appreciate the significance of self-awareness.
  2. Value a liberal arts education.
  3. Set goals, plan, and reflect upon learning using aspects of using learning science: metacognition, self-regulated learning, and motivation.
  4. Describe academic strategies, policies, and pathways and their link to resources such as academic advising and career services.
  5. Reflect on the science of thriving: positive emotion, engagement, meaning, healthy relationships, resilience, stress, and other aspects of well-being.
  6. Demonstrate mastery of basic mental health, drug and alcohol, and sexual wellness practices.

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Learning Outcomes

  1. Communicate orally and in writing in a foreign language about a variety of real-life situations with a variety of audiences.
  2. Demonstrate comprehension of oral and written texts in a foreign language on a wide range of topics to discuss everyday life, as well as life in a cross-cultural context.
  3. Apply perspectives, practices, and ideas associated with the culture(s) of a foreign language.

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Focus Capacities

Students develop the ability to analyze literature and/or artistic works, to understand how they relate to the historical circumstances of their creation, and to think critically about the past, present, and future contributions of these works to a shared world.

Questions for Students

  1. What is the particular value of aesthetic experience and how does it generate meanings, responses, and acts of reflection?
  2. What makes an artistic work different from other forms of expression?
  3. How does creative attention to an aesthetic object reveal new ideas, articulate values, and reflect or enact art’s functions in the world?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Interpret and critique literary and artistic expression.
  2. Analyze literary and artistic works in various contexts (social, political, historical, philosophical, etc.) and with regard to style, period, and the circumstances of composition.
  3. Explain how aesthetic expression enhances human experience.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

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Students engage in individual and collaborative creative expression, exploration, or production, such as in performance, visual art, composition, design, or technology. They engage with tools, techniques, methods, design processes, technologies, and materials for creating works that express, innovate, or create solutions to problems.

Questions for Students

  1. What processes and practices can I use to produce meaningful expression or effective solutions with lasting impact?
  2. How does collaboration and teamwork change or enhance the creative process?
  3. How does a design strategy affect or enhance the creation and evaluation of a work of value?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Compose, design, build, present, or perform a work that is the result of immersion in a creative process using appropriate media, tools, and techniques.
  2. Explain the roles and influences of creativity, technologies, materials, and design processes in the creation of knowledge, expression, and effective solutions.
  3. Evaluate their own and others’ creative work to demonstrate how critique creates value in creative domains.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

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Students acquire knowledge through evidence about human experience in one or more eras of the human past and learn to evaluate, synthesize, and communicate that evidence, applying it to their lives in the present.

Questions for Students

  1. What events, conflicts, and continuities shaped an era of the human past?
  2. What distinctive kinds of evidence do we use to interpret and understand the human past?
  3. How have people made decisions and acted in light of historical knowledge?
  4. How does the material and historical past survive in the present and affect our perception of both the past and the present?
  5. What conditions and processes shape our approach to the human past?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop knowledge of different spatiotemporal scales, patterns, ideas, figures, and events from the past.
  2. Evaluate primary source material and/or other historical evidence of past conditions (e.g., behaviors, events, and social, cultural, economic, and/or political structures); assess divergent or complementary methods, materials, and/or methodologies in interpreting the human past.
  3. Assess conflicting historical narratives based on evidence and methodologies.
  4. Generate and evaluate arguments based the analysis of primary and scholarly sources.
  5. Apply historical methods and knowledge to make informed judgments about the past and the present.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

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Students develop their capacity to think carefully and critically about how to make and justify private and public decisions.

Questions for Students

  1. How can people think fruitfully (individually and together) about how they should live their lives?
  2. What is required to judge a standard or value as worthy of support?
  3. How should we distinguish between prejudices and reasonable grounds for value judgments?
  4. What considerations – stories, reasons, testimony, documents, data, etc. – can justify our values and commitments, whether personal or social?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the contexts in which questions of justification arise.
  2. Assess ethical values in terms of reasons offered
  3. Recognize different ethical perspectives and the distinctive approaches these perspectives bring to questions of value, evaluating ethical justifications for different ways of organizing civic and political communities.
  4. Analyze the differences between personal ethical decisions and those bearing on the public and civic spheres.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

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Students study and engage with global processes shaping the world and its peoples, including those beyond the North Atlantic region (United States, Canada, and Western Europe). They develop deep knowledge of historic or contemporary roles and differential effects of human organizations and actions on global systems.

Questions for Students

  1. What forces connect and distinguish the experiences of peoples, societies, and human organization around the world?
  2. How can I understand and compare differing worldviews?
  3. What connections and differences exist between particular worldviews, experiences, societies, or power structures?
  4. What ideas, approaches, and international sources allow scholars to compare societies?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Classify and analyze diverse historical, social, and political exchanges that shape nations, regions, and cultural traditions of the world.
  2. Translate among contrasting civic cultures, social values, and moral commitments that characterize differences among peoples and societies, including those beyond the North Atlantic region.
  3. Assess ways that political and economic institutions shape contemporary global relations.
  4. Explain human and environmental challenges that transcend national borders.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

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Students learn how to make and interpret scientific descriptions and explanations of the natural world, practice the skills of scientific inquiry, and evaluate scientific evidence within the contexts of both scientific communities and society.

Questions for Students

  1. What rules govern the natural world and how are they discovered, tested, and validated?
  2. What is distinctive about the approach to understanding employed in the natural sciences?
  3. What challenges are encountered in making measurements of the natural world?
  4. What are the limits of investigation in the natural sciences?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the ability to use scientific knowledge, logic, and imagination to construct and justify scientific claims about naturally occurring phenomena, including validation through rigorous empirical testing.
  2. Analyze and apply processes of scientific inquiry as dictated by the phenomena and questions at hand. These include generating and testing hypotheses or theories pertaining to the natural world; using logic and creativity to design investigations to test these hypotheses; collecting and interpreting data about the natural world; making inferences that respect measurement error; building and justifying arguments and explanations; communicating and defending conclusions; revising arguments and conclusions based on new evidence and/or feedback from peers; and synthesizing new knowledge into broader scientific understanding.
  3. Evaluate science-related claims and information from popular and/or peer-reviewed sources by examining the relationship between the evidence, arguments, and conclusions presented and by assessing consistency with existing knowledge from valid and reliable scientific sources.
  4. Identify, assess, and make informed decisions about ethical issues at the intersections of the natural sciences and society.

The General Education Oversight Committee approved changes to the learning outcomes on 3-26-2021.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

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Students engage with the histories, perspectives, politics, intellectual traditions, and/or expressive cultures of populations and communities that have historically been disempowered, and the structural and historical processes by which that disempowerment has endured and changed.

Questions for Students

  1. What are the relevant structures, institutions, ways of thinking, and practices that create, maintain, and change social, economic, and political inequalities?
  2. What practices have been implemented and institutionalized to address social, economic, and political inequalities?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Recognize the relationship between inequality and social, economic, and political power.
  2. Analyze configurations of power and the forms of inequality and bias they produce.
  3. Evaluate dynamics of social, economic, and political inequality in relation to specific historical contexts.
  4. Interrogate the systemic processes by which forms of inequality are sustained and how these processes have been and are resisted and transformed.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

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Students learn to comprehend and apply mathematical concepts in authentic contexts, developing tools for reasoning with data, logic, and quantitative methods.

Questions for Students

  1. What is the role of mathematics in organizing and interpreting measurements of the world?
  2. How can mathematical models and quantitative analysis be used to summarize or synthesize data into knowledge and predictions?
  3. What methodology can we apply to validate or reject mathematical models or to express our degree of confidence in them?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Summarize, interpret, and present quantitative data in mathematical forms, such as graphs, diagrams, tables, or mathematical text.
  2. Develop or compute representations of data using mathematical forms or equations as models, and use statistical methods to assess their validity.
  3. Make and evaluate important assumptions in the estimation, modeling, and analysis of data, and recognize the limitations of the results.
  4. Apply mathematical concepts, data, procedures, and solutions to make judgments and draw conclusions.
  5. Synthesize and present quantitative data to others to explain findings or to provide quantitative evidence in support of a position.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

This capacity presumes that the enrolled students already have the requisite mathematical skills which may be established through appropriate assessment or by completion of an online or classroom-based course in quantitative literacy:

  1. Recognize and apply basic calculations (including fractions, percentages, exponents, and radicals), distributive and commutative properties, and basic logic.
  2. Use functions and operations, including exponential, logarithmic, and piecewise linear functions.
  3. Manipulate equations to express them in different ways and/or find solutions.
  4. Qualitatively sketch basic functions (e.g., linear, quadratic, power laws, exponential, logarithmic).
  5. Solve word problems that lead to systems of linear (and possibly quadratic) equations in two variables.

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Students develop intellectual humility, learning to question assumptions, categories, and norms that structure their worldviews and to understand the sources and effects of biases. They learn, use, and distinguish strengths and weaknesses of one or more approach(es) to knowledge of the unfamiliar, such as: aesthetically, philosophically, linguistically, historically, or culturally remote forms of knowledge and world-making, or formal logic, scientific practice, and similar formalized approaches to countering bias and creating knowledge.

Questions for Students

  1. What norms and expectations do I take for granted?
  2. What categories and concepts frame my assumptions, experiences, and beliefs?
  3. What practices of investigation or inquiry best challenge those assumptions and expectations?
  4. How can I consider whether my beliefs might be wrong?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Recognize and use one or more approach(es) to developing and validating knowledge of the unfamiliar world.
  2. Evaluate ways that temporal, spatial, scientific, and philosophical categories structure knowledge.
  3. Interrogate assumptions that underlie our own perceptions of the world.
  4. Employ strategies to mitigate or adjust for preconceptions and biases.
  5. Apply critical insights to understand patterns of experience and belief.

Recurring Capacities

Focus capacity classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

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One Focus Capacity course must include or be associated with a one-credit Empirical Investigation Lab. In such labs, students participate in measurement, data collection and analysis, and hypothesis testing connected to the course content. An Empirical Investigation Lab is not usually a separate class; ordinarily it is a fourth credit attached to another Focus Capacity class.

  1. Take empirical measurements using appropriate apparatus.
  2. Generate and test hypotheses.
  3. Gather, store, and organize data.
  4. Analyze and report on data and hypothesis testing.

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Reflection and Integration

Student immerse themselves in a research project and experience the reflection and revision involved in producing and disseminating original scholarship or creative works.

Questions for Students

  1. How do I establish my point of view, take intellectual risks, and begin producing original scholarship or creative works?
  2. How do I narrow my topic, critique current scholarship, and gather evidence in systematic and responsible ways?
  3. How do I evaluate my findings and communicate my conclusions?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Frame a topic, develop an original research question or creative goal, and establish a point of view, creative approach, or hypothesis.
  2. Obtain a procedural understanding of how conclusions can be reached in a field and gather appropriate evidence.
  3. Evaluate the quality of the arguments and/or evidence in support of the emerging product.
  4. Communicate findings in a clear and compelling ways.
  5. Critique and identify the limits of the conclusions of the project and generate ideas for future work.

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Students enrich and expand their academic study by engaging in compelling applied experiences that transform their learning.

Questions for Students

  1. How do things I’ve learned in the classroom apply to outside settings?
  2. How can experiences and observation raise or answer questions in academic settings?
  3. How can I meaningfully reflect to help navigate complexities and ambiguities I encounter?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the connections between academic studies and outside-the-classroom experiences and observations.
  2. Apply knowledge in complex or ambiguous situations.
  3. Develop questions from experiences and observations to deepen and extend academic inquiry.

Students enrich and expand their academic study by engaging in compelling public service experiences that transform their learning.

Questions for Students

  1. How do things I’ve learned in the classroom apply to public service?
  2. How can public service influence my learning in my courses?
  3. How does my public service help me navigate complexities and ambiguities I encounter in professional and public service settings in the future?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the connections between academic studies and public service experiences and observations.
  2. Apply knowledge in complex or ambiguous professional situations.
  3. Develop questions from public service and observations to deepen and extend academic inquiry.

Students enrich and expand their academic study by engaging in immersive learning experiences abroad, at U.S. study cities, or in global virtual classrooms.

Questions for Students

  1. How do things I’ve learned in the classroom apply in a different global context?
  2. How can global experiences influence questions in academic settings?
  3. How can I better understand and engage with people from cultures or backgrounds different from mine?
  4. How does a global experience expand my understanding of myself and my own culture?
  5. How can I meaningfully reflect on complexities and ambiguities I encounter in global settings?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the connections between academic studies and global experiences and observations.
  2. Apply academic knowledge in different global contexts (cultural, linguistic, geographic, social, political, historical, economic).
  3. Develop the skills and mindset needed to navigate in a different global context (cultural, linguistic, geographic, social, political, historical, economic).
  4. Develop the skills and mindset needed for further study, research, or work in a globally diverse community.

Students enrich and expand their academic study by engaging in compelling professional experiences that transform their learning.

Questions for Students

  1. How do things I’ve learned in the classroom apply to professional settings?
  2. How can professional experiences influence questions in academic settings?
  3. How can I meaningfully reflect on my internship to help me navigate complexities and ambiguities I encounter in professional settings in the future?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the connections between academic studies and professional experiences and observations.
  2. Apply knowledge in complex or ambiguous professional situations.
  3. Develop questions from professional experiences and observations to deepen and extend academic inquiry.

Students enrich and expand their academic study by engaging in compelling creative experiences that transform their learning.

Questions for Students

  1. How do things I’ve learned in the classroom apply to performance or production?
  2. How can performance or production experiences influence questions in academic settings?
  3. How can I meaningfully reflect on my performance or production experiences to help me navigate complexities and ambiguities I encounter with creative performance in the future?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the connections between academic studies and actual creative practice.
  2. Apply knowledge in complex creative demands.
  3. Develop questions from performance or production experiences and observations to deepen and extend academic inquiry.

Students enrich and expand their academic study by engaging in compelling teaching experiences that transform their learning.

Questions for Students

  1. How do things I’ve learned in the classroom apply to helping other students learn?
  2. How can my teaching experiences and observations raise or answer questions in other academic settings?
  3. Based on my experiences as both a student and educator, what questions do I have that could warrant further reflection, action, or investigation.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the connections between academic studies and teaching experiences and observations.
  2. Apply knowledge in complex or ambiguous teaching.
  3. Develop questions from peer teaching experiences and observations to deepen and extend academic inquiry.

COIL courses connect UNC students and instructors with peers at a university in another country for shared teaching and experiential learning. Students and faculty work together, negotiating differences of language, culture, geography, society, technology, and educational systems.

Questions for Students

  1. How do things I’ve learned in the classroom apply across cultures or countries?
  2. How can I effectively manage working virtually in teams with people in different locations?
  3. What can I do to better understand and engage with people from cultures or backgrounds different from mine?
  4. How can I meaningfully reflect to help navigate complexities and ambiguities I encounter in working with people from other countries or cultures?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop new ways of problem-solving in a team-oriented environment.
  2. Develop skills in listening, presenting ideas, and sharing perspectives with peers from different backgrounds or cultures.
  3. Apply academic knowledge in different real-world contexts (geographic, social, cultural, etc.).
  4. Develop the skills needed to coordinate with peers across different languages, cultures, time zones, and technological accessibility.

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Students build capacities for producing and listening to oral communication across a range of contexts. With multiple audiences, they learn to listen to and persuasively convey knowledge, ideas, and information.

Questions for Students

  1. How can I engage with audiences through oral communication?
  2. How do I best convey knowledge, ideas, and information effectively to different audiences in situations?
  3. How can I best understand the views and ideas of others, both individually and collectively?
  4. What are the best ways of strategizing and delivering oral communication for achieving my intended outcomes?
  5. How can media or digital compositions extend my ability to communicate?

Learning Outcomes

  1. Ascertain the expectations, opportunities, and barriers to oral communication in distinct situations.
  2. Tailor communications to different kinds of settings, including individual, small group, and public communication.
  3. Tailor communications to different levels of expertise (inexpert, informed, expert), and to varying levels of alignment (resistant, ambivalent, supportive) and distinct contexts.
  4. Make informed situation- and audience-sensitive strategic choices in content and delivery.
  5. Improve ability to move audiences, as measure by best practices, audience feedback, and instructor feedback.

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Recurring Capacities

Focus Capacity (FC) classes sustain the recurring capacities of inquiry that guide the general education mission. As appropriate to the course’s topic, each class should:

  • Pose problems and questions that require systematic thinking about evidence, argument and uncertainty;
  • Consider its content in the context of human difference between and within societies; the full range of legitimate debate in its field; and/or change over time
  • Require
    • Writing totaling at least 10 pages in length, or the intellectual equivalent.
    • Presenting material to the class, small groups, or the public through oral presentations, webpages, or other means that enable corroboration of fact and argument.
    • Collaborating in pairs or groups to learn, design, solve, create, build, research or similar.

See chart below for examples.

Examples

Requirement Examples
Writing (10 pages) ·         Ten page paper or multiple shorter papers that address research questions or argue a point of view

·         Short in-class writing activities

·         Playwriting

·         Fiction composition

·         Discussion board or blog contributions

Intellectual equivalents to the 10 pages of writing ·         Performance: perform multiple scenes, or present sense memory exercises.

·         Design oriented activities: several iterations of costume renderings or build set models.

·         Compositions in formats other than the written word

Presenting ·         Think-pair-share techniques in-class

·         Individual student or group oral presentations

·         Jigsaw techniques in-class

·         Poster presentations

·         Debates

·         Infographics

·         Website postings for external audiences

Collaborating ·         Think-pair-shares in class

·         Group exams

·         Peer-editing work

·         Group assignments

·         Capstone projects

·         Partner-based labs

·         Makerspace team projects

 

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